Finnish anti-piracy group CIAPC seizes child's laptop
France-based video game publisher Ubisoft elicited scorn from gamers and consumer rights advocates due to its widespread implementation of 'always on' DRM protection within the PC versions of countless titles. The measure was intended to cut-down on piracy, but found little favor within the gaming community. In January, the company relented and removed all DRM via an update. Ironically, Ubisoft is now being accused of including music torrents from file-sharing site Demonoid as a bonus in the PC release of hit game "Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood." Especially odd since the music in question is Ubisoft's own "Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood" soundtrack.
Apple's upcoming iCloud service is expected to build on the company's iTunes success and introduce millions of music-lovers to a new way to store and access their collections. However, a report from IHS iSuppli considers the downside to the company's plans: a marked decline in demand for NAND flash memory storage in the years to come.
As anti-piracy efforts continue, so too does the number of people sued by movie studios and record labels. A chart which purports to count the number of U.S. residents named as "John Does" in illicit file-sharing lawsuits is closing it on a new milestone. And with PROTECT IP not completely off the table, the number may continue to rise.
If you are looking for a Netflix streaming box and don’t have a lot of money to spend then you might just be in luck. Roku is adding another box to their lineup of affordable video streaming devices. The Roku LT will debut in early November and will only cost $50.
MP3 files from popular online stores such as iTunes are ostensibly free of digital rights management, but they still contain information about the listener that could be used to enforce DRM in the cloud some day, according to a...
The controversial PROTECT IP bill languished on Capitol Hill, but a new proposal could take up its cause. HR 3261, or the Stop Online Piracy Act, will "promote prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property" and allow the U.S. Attorney General to go after foreign sites engaging in copyright infringement.
Five nations have been singled out by U.S. lawmakers who say the specified countries have showed little effort to stifle widespread piracy.
Ditching the illegal but keeping the free, infamous Swedish torrent depot The Pirate Bay announced on Monday an initiative dubbed "The Promo Bay" to help new and struggling musicians and filmmakers. The ongoing contest will offer the site's own home page to lucky winners.
Microsoft has removed one cumbersome step from its Zune online music store by letting people pay for MP3s with a credit card.
First, music geeks. Then, the world. Apple's iCloud and Google Music Beta helped catapult cloud-based storage into the mainstream lexicon last year, allowing users to store downloaded tracks online and access them on myriad devices. That's only the beginning, says Gartner.
Two weeks ago, MasterCard felt the wrath of Anonymous Operation Payback-style DDoS attacks after refusing to process payments that were intended to fund WikiLeaks, the website which began leaking confidential US diplomatic cables last month. Now, the company is preparing to head down another controversial path by pledging to deny transactions which support websites that host pirated movies, music, games, or other copyrighted content.
Hacker Rui Pinto, 30, has been indicted for 147 criminal offences following his arrest in Hungary last January. Pinto was nabbed for leaking sensitive documents related to the dirty practices in the soccer industry. Portugal’s national prosecutor as charged...
Predictably, Amazon’s new Cloud Player and Cloud Drive online file storage services are not being well-received by music industry representatives.
BTS is one of the most famous boy bands in the music industry. Originally a hip-hop group that later evolved into varied music genres; the seven-member band has broken numerous music records and even some Guinness World Records.The bands...
Not to be outdone by Apple, Google, or Amazon, Best Buy has decided to launch their own music service. The service, called Best Buy Music Cloud, allows users to upload their music and access it via computer, phone, or tablet. While it's nice to see Best Buy at least making an attempt to keep up with other music services, their system comes with a number of restrictions and caveats.

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