Google ups DRM efforts with e-books & online video

Google continues to work towards protecting its online ventures, including using digital rights management (DRM) for online video, e-books, and other consumer services. Specifically, Google recently strengthened its online video services and e-book efforts as the company embraces new technologies.

The new Google e-book store contains more than 3 million e-books that can be read on the Apple iPad, Barnes & Noble Nook, the iPhone, Android devices and other popular consumer devices. Google has elected to use the Adobe Content Server 4 in an effort to sell DRM-protected e-books across numerous platforms.

Google ups DRM efforts with e-books & online video

The ability to purchase e-books directly from Google — or through online stores and book stores — while also being playable on multiple products only proves the importance of DRM, according to some software developers. The key will be to see if Google can protect the e-books without intruding into legal customer e-book playback.

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Once a book has been purchased, it can be added to an online library tied to a Google account — and it can be shared on devices with Web access.

Google also acquired the Widevine DRM software company so the search giant will be able to offer protected streaming content. Widevine is currently used by AT&T, Best Buy, Blockbuster, Netflix, and VUDU as their DRM provider for services. Since there are so many other companies involved (including rival companies), Google said it would continue Widevine’s current business agreements.

Utilizing the current contracts in place, Google also is able to work with Widevine’s clients to reach new revenue streams.

Ideally, the Widevine acquisition will be utilized through YouTube and Google TV as Sony and other partners test the new Google TV software platform. The company needs to bring content partners on-board while also convincing them the platform is secure.

In Google’s video and content distribution efforts, this makes perfect business sense to pick up Widevine for DRM use. YouTube generates more than 2 billion video views each day, and Google is working to raise the quality of video streams — and ensure they are safer from pirates.

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