Microsoft continues aggressive Windows 10 upgrade campaign with new full screen upgrade screen

Posted 01 July 2016 17:25 CET by Jan Willem Aldershoff

Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users who didn’t want to upgrade to Windows 10 and deleted the ‘Get Windows 10’ application from their computer, are now targeted by Microsoft with a full screen message urging them to upgrade to Windows 10.

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The message is caused by KB3173040 and its headline states, “Sorry to interrupt you but this is important, Windows 10 free upgrade offers ends July 29”. The message goes on with, “Microsoft recommends upgrading to Windows 10 – the most secure Windows ever built. The upgrade is free and you can easily roll-back to your current operating system within 31 days if you decide Windows 10 is not right for you. We’ll check for compatability before starting the upgrade. Over 300 million people have upgraded. Upgrade your PC before the offer ends”.

Users can then select to either upgrade now or to be reminded later. It’s also possible to select to be notified three more times or to be never notified again.

The full screen message is not shown when a recent version of the “Get Windows 10” app is installed, when the Do not notify me again option is selected or when the computer is detected to be incompatible with Windows 10. Also users who previously uninstalled Windows 10 after they upgraded, who had a failed Windows 10 installation, who disabled the Windows 10 upgrade or who disabled the offer screen through registry key settings will not see the message.

This means that it’s likely only a handful of users will receive the full screen Windows 10 upgrade offer. Nevertheless, it’s another aggressive attempt of Microsoft to try to convince Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users to upgrade to its latest operating system.

It’s currently unclear how KB3173040 finds it way to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 installations, but it’s likely part of a recent Windows Update patch.

Yesterday we reported that Microsoft has promised to be less aggressive in trying to convince users to upgrade to Windows 10.


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