RIAA tries to meddle in net neutrality proposal

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has asked Google to include new wording in its current net neutrality plan to address music piracy and child pornography.

The RIAA hopes to give Internet service providers the ability to crack down on subscribers for infractions that range from file sharing and child porn to other criminal behavior.

RIAA tries to meddle in net neutrality proposal

The letter was sent from the RIAA and 12 music groups to Google, which recently continued the net neutrality debate along with Verizon. The RIAA has attempted this virtually every time the U.S. government has discussed net neutrality, with the group’s fight expected to continue into the future.

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“We all share the goal of a robust Internet that is highly accessible, secure and safe for individuals and commerce,” the letter written by the RIAA to Google CEO Eric Schmidt reads. “An Internet predicated on order, rather than chaos, facilitates achievement of this goal.”

Also in the letter, ISPs must be given the ability to deter unlawful activity, the RIAA states — which in itself isn’t a unique request — as the FCC’s version of a net neutrality plan also wouldn’t protect file sharing. Meanwhile, AT&T is requesting the FCC focus more on spectrum rather than net neutrality, though the government is looking to handle both problems.

It’s not too surprising the RIAA wants to have a net neutrality clause that will allow it to force ISPs to better handle file sharing subscribers — but net neutrality supporters will likely ignore the RIAA’s ideas. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and similar groups are worried the RIAA’s involvement in the project could lead to free speech limitations, though both issues are seen as important.

Ironically, the RIAA’s John Doe lawsuit campaign didn’t require ISP monitoring or additional support, and nor would the proposed three-strikes policy that has been widely discussed. The RIAA likely won’t gain anything from this stunt, but it showcases the group’s continued efforts on influencing government legislation.

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